onethingwell

wasavi is an extension for Chrome, Opera and Firefox. wasavi transforms TEXTAREA element of any page into a VI editor, so you can edit the text in VI. wasavi supports almost all VI commands and some ex commands.

So very awesome.

Wasavi is about the most amazing and geekiest thing I have seen in a long time. I’m always trying to use vim in places I shouldn’t, and this covers a lot of those.

jacsfishburne
jacsfishburne:

adventuresinslumberland:

alonethyme:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

one time a man approached my mom and i (while we were walking back to our car which had a temporary handicap placard because my mom had both of her hips replaced and she obviously had trouble walking) and he said “wow, you don’t LOOK disabled!” to my mom’s face, expecting an explanation. there are few times I have been more angry and surprised than in that moment. my mom had worked so hard to APPEAR like she was “healthy” because that’s what we’re supposed to do, right? she spent so much time trying to walk “normally” again and it was exhausting and she needed that placard. ugh.

The amount of shit people will throw at someone with an invisible illness is disgusting, even if it’s not outright getting in someone’s face. The amount of little remarks and micro aggressions I hear every day while dealing with invisible illness is disgusting. DEALING WITH ABLEISM IN MY OWN HOME THAT IS SUPPOSED TO BE A SAFE AND HEALING SPACE IS DISGUSTING.It’s not just ignorant or rude people, even people who pride themselves on being so “radical” and whatever will present you with micro aggressions drilled into their minds from a young age. 
Invisible illnesses are realAbleism is real (even if you don’t realize yer part of the problem or face it)Educate yerself

I deal with this shit so often. The glares from people if my leg is out and I can’t give up a seat on a train. The child who saw me trying to get my arm working again while driving who sat behind his mother in the car and made fun of the movement until he was through the toll plaza.Please, please, please, believe me when I say that just because someone appears “healthy,” it doesn’t mean they are.

jacsfishburne:

adventuresinslumberland:

alonethyme:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

one time a man approached my mom and i (while we were walking back to our car which had a temporary handicap placard because my mom had both of her hips replaced and she obviously had trouble walking) and he said “wow, you don’t LOOK disabled!” to my mom’s face, expecting an explanation. there are few times I have been more angry and surprised than in that moment. my mom had worked so hard to APPEAR like she was “healthy” because that’s what we’re supposed to do, right? she spent so much time trying to walk “normally” again and it was exhausting and she needed that placard. ugh.

The amount of shit people will throw at someone with an invisible illness is disgusting, even if it’s not outright getting in someone’s face. The amount of little remarks and micro aggressions I hear every day while dealing with invisible illness is disgusting. DEALING WITH ABLEISM IN MY OWN HOME THAT IS SUPPOSED TO BE A SAFE AND HEALING SPACE IS DISGUSTING.
It’s not just ignorant or rude people, even people who pride themselves on being so “radical” and whatever will present you with micro aggressions drilled into their minds from a young age. 

Invisible illnesses are real
Ableism is real (even if you don’t realize yer part of the problem or face it)
Educate yerself

I deal with this shit so often. The glares from people if my leg is out and I can’t give up a seat on a train. The child who saw me trying to get my arm working again while driving who sat behind his mother in the car and made fun of the movement until he was through the toll plaza.
Please, please, please, believe me when I say that just because someone appears “healthy,” it doesn’t mean they are.

meganmcisaac

meganmcisaac:

My best friend for the past 5 years decided to leave last week. Who knows what really happened, where he is, if he’s alive, if he chose to be on his own, if he’ll ever come back… I don’t know but god damn I loved him more than any creature I’d ever known. What a great guy, so smart and so fearless (except for drums, he hates drums). He explored with me in so many ways, lived in many different neighborhoods, & on many different beds. Today I move away from the home he left, and into a new one across town. I pray to all gods imagined that he is healthy and free, loving and hunting and sleeping and exploring. I hope I see you again someday, Linus. Thank you for being so lovely.

If you happen to ever find yourself exploring Silver Lake (Los Angeles), keep an eye out for my cat with the crooked tail (it looks like a periscope, hard to miss). Catch him if you can…

kvetchlandia
kvetchlandia:

Florette Lartigue     Photographers Jacques-Henri Lartigue and Richard Avedon, New York City     1966

"To talk about photos rather than making them seems idiotic to me. It’s as though I went on and on about a woman I adored instead of making love to her."  Jacques-Henri Lartigue


"I hate cameras. They interfere, they’re always in the way. I wish I could work with my eyes alone." Richard Avedon

kvetchlandia:

Florette Lartigue     Photographers Jacques-Henri Lartigue and Richard Avedon, New York City     1966

"To talk about photos rather than making them seems idiotic to me. It’s as though I went on and on about a woman I adored instead of making love to her."  Jacques-Henri Lartigue

"I hate cameras. They interfere, they’re always in the way. I wish I could work with my eyes alone." Richard Avedon